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Nokia 9 release date, news and rumors

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Update: Part of the Nokia 9 has seemingly been caught on camera, backing up previous leaks.

Prior to the very recent launch of the Nokia 8 it had been a long time since we’d had a Nokia flagship, but another new one is rumored to be on the way, and it’s set to be bigger than the Nokia 8.

HMD Global – the company that’s revived the Nokia name on smartphones – has so far otherwise unleashed a handful of entry-level and mid-range phones, like the Nokia 5, but the high-end Nokia 9 might launch before the year is out, and it could be positioned to compete with the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S8 and iPhone 8.

We’re already starting to hear rumors about it, all of which you’ll find below along with our expert analysis, and as soon as we hear anything new we’ll add it to this article.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? A Nokia Android flagship
  • When is it out? Probably late 2017
  • What will it cost? It will have a high-end price

Nokia 9 release date

All the Nokia 9 launch rumors we’d heard were seemingly actually referring to the Nokia 8, but that doesn’t mean the Nokia 9 is dead.

In fact, a representative for HMD Global has now hinted that the phone is on the way, and that it will have a larger screen “to meet the needs of absolutely all users.”

We don’t know when we’ll see the Nokia 9, but the rumored specs would put it in line with other 2017 flagships, so it might land before the end of the year.

Nokia 9 screen

Hottest leaks:

  • A 5.5-inch QHD OLED screen

We’ve heard multiple sources say the screen on the Nokia 9 will be a 5.5-inch QHD display.

QHD typically means 1440 x 2560 and it’s the standard flagship screen resolution, though some phones, such as the Sony Xperia XZ Premium, are now pushing above that. 5.5 inches is a fairly typical size too – not a small screen but not quite a phablet either.

The possible use of OLED is perhaps the most interesting aspect. This is the screen tech used by Samsung on many of its phones, but one which isn’t widely used elsewhere.

It tends to deliver more vibrant, but potentially less natural colors than an LCD display, and could soon be the tech of choice among flagship makers, with Apple also rumored to be using it in upcoming handsets.

However, the Nokia 8 stuck with LCD, and is only slightly smaller at 5.3 inches, so for the Nokia 9 to stand out we’d think it might push the size up further.

Nokia 9 design

Hottest leaks:

  • An all-metal body
  • Water resistance
  • A curvy build

One source claims the Nokia 9 will have an all-metal body, while another says to expect it to be IP68 certified, which would make it dust proof and water resistant to 1.5 meters deep for up to 30 minutes.

We’ve now seen a leaked image giving us a close look at the front and back of a phone believed to be the Nokia 9, and it looks a lot like the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, with a curved screen, bezels above and below and what appears to be a glass back – in contrast to the all-metal claims.

The Nokia 9 could be a curvy, glass-backed phone. Credit: @baidunokibar

The image also shows a dual-lens camera and a rear-facing fingerprint scanner.

 

The Nokia 9 shown here looks a lot like the photo above. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

Image 2 of 5

This side of the Nokia 9 seems to house volume controls. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

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There’s no sign of a headphone port in these images. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

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There’s a USB-C port on the bottom of the Nokia 9. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

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This side of the Nokia 9 looks to house the SIM card slot. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

We’ve also seemingly now seen an image of the Nokia 9 in the flesh, or at least its backplate, and it matches the renders above, complete with a glossy finish, a dual-lens camera and a rear-facing fingerprint scanner.

A couple of sketches have leaked out of the supply chain too, but we’re not 100 percent sure of their authenticity for now – they show a Nokia 9 with very narrow bezels top and bottom, just like several other 2017 flagships.

TechRadar’s take: The curvy leaked image of the Nokia 9 looks convincing, while water resistance is believable, as it’s a feature found on a number of high-end handsets.

Nokia 9 camera

Hottest leaks:

  • A dual-lens 22MP Carl Zeiss camera
  • A 12MP front-facing camera

The earliest Nokia 9 rumors pointed to a dual-lens camera, and a more recent leak backs that up, with a tipster claiming it will have a 22MP dual-lens Carl Zeiss snapper on the back and a 12MP camera on the front.

Both of those cameras have more megapixels than most phones, though they’re not quite a match for the 41MP Nokia Lumia 1020.

Of course megapixels aren’t everything and most flagships (including the Nokia 8) have settled on rear cameras of around 12 or 13MP, so it remains to be seen how good the cameras will actually be.

There’s also no information yet on what the second lens will be used for – it could be used for optical zoom for example, or for wide-angle shots, or something else entirely.

In the Nokia 8’s case there’s a monochrome lens and an RGB one, which are combined for better shots, especially in low light, so that’s our best guess for now.

The couple of rumors we’ve heard both point to a dual-lens camera and the Nokia 8 already has such a snapper, so that will almost certainly be what we get, but we’re less sure about the rumored megapixel count.

Nokia 9 battery

Hottest leaks:

  • A huge 3,800mAh battery
  • Fast charging

There’s only one battery rumor so far, and it points to a 3,800mAh juice pack with Qualcomm Quick Charge 4.

That would make it far bigger than most smartphone batteries, with even something like the LG G6 having just a 3,300mAh battery.

TechRadar’s take: A 3,800mAh battery seems surprisingly large for a 5.5-inch phone, so we’re not totally convinced by that, but it’s possible. Fast charging is likely, as that’s become a fairly standard flagship feature and is available on the Nokia 8.

Nokia 9 OS and power

Hottest leaks:

  • A Snapdragon 835 chipset
  • 4GB, 6GB or 8GB of RAM
  • Android 7 or later software

Early sources claim the Nokia 9 will have a Snapdragon 835 chipset and 6GB of RAM – though we’re only talking about two sources here. That would make for a high-end spec, topping even the Sony Xperia XZ Premium and the US version of the Samsung Galaxy S8, both of which use that chip but have just 4GB of RAM.

One of the sources adds that the Nokia 9 will also have an Adreno 540 GPU and run Android Nougat 7.1.2, which at time of writing is the latest Android release, but may not be by the time the phone actually launches.

Since then we’ve seen two benchmarks for the phone, both of which also list a Snapdragon 835 chipset, but one of which lists 4GB of RAM, while the other claims it comes with 8GB. However, if there is an 8GB model in the works we wouldn’t expect to see it in the west.

We wouldn’t expect to see any kind of overlay, as HMD Global has stuck with stock Android on its current crop of handsets.

TechRadar’s take: The rumored specs would put the Nokia 9 at the very top-end, but they’re not unbelievable, especially as HMD will want to make a splash with its second flagship phone. That said, we’d guess 4GB of RAM is more likely than 6GB or 8GB.

Nokia 9 other features

Hottest leaks:

  • 3D audio recording
  • An iris scanner
  • A fingerprint scanner

According to one source the Nokia 9 will have both an iris scanner and a fingerprint scanner, much like the Galaxy S8.

The same – anonymous and unproven – source claims that it will have OZO audio enhancements. This is a Nokia tech which creates a surround sound effect when you’re recording audio. It lets smartphones with four microphones record 3D audio, those with three capture spatial 360 audio, and those with two capture spatial audio.

However, the source doesn’t mention how many mics the Nokia 9 has, so even if this is true we don’t know how heavily it will be able to take advantage of the tech.

TechRadar’s take: None of these rumors are unbelievable, but as they all come from the same unproven source we wouldn’t read too much into them.

Nokia 9 price

Hottest leaks:

  • A $699 (roughly £640/AU$1,060) price
  • May cost more for higher storage capacities

Only one tipster has mentioned the possible price of the Nokia 9 so far and they reckon it’s going to be expensive, coming in at $699 in the US (around £565/AU$935) and 749 euros (roughly £640/AU$1,060).

Direct conversions are rarely accurate, but of the two the second one is likely to be closer to the UK and Australian price, as phone prices tend to be higher internationally than you’d get with a direct conversion from the US price.

The source also mentioned that the Nokia 9 will come in both 64GB and 128GB varieties. They didn’t specify which of those these prices are for, but we’d assume this is the starting price, in which case you’d get 64GB for that.

 

A lover of all things tech, love all things that uses creative juices (not an innuendo) an avid blogger and part time vlogger, now stop reading and go check out some awesome posts on this site.

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Google Doodle honors ‘Prince of Mathematicians’ Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss

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Maths is the latest to receive the Google Doodle homage.

Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss, otherwise known as “The Prince of Mathematicians”, made instrumental contributions to number theory, algebra, geophysics, mechanics and statistics.

Gauss was born on April 30 in 1777 in Brunswick, a city in the north of Germany, near Wolfsburg. Despite poor working-class parents and an illiterate mother, Gauss was a child prodigy, believed to have been able to add up every number from 1 to 100 at 8-years-old.

One of his first major equations was working out his date of birth, which his mother hadn’t recorded. He used the only information she had: that it was a Wednesday, eight days before an Easter holiday.

At university when he was 19, Gauss discovered a heptadecagon, or a 17-sided polygon. He requested that a regular heptadecagon be inscribed on his tombstone, but it was too difficult for the stonemason, who said it would just look like a circle.

513px-regular-polygon-17-annotated-svg
 A heptadecagon.

 


László Németh/Wikipedia

And remember your prime numbers? That year Gauss was involved with proving the prime number theorem, helping understand how prime numbers are distributed among the integers, or whole numbers.

Again the same year, a productive one for Gauss, he discovered the quadratic reciprocity law, which allows mathematicians to determine the solvability of any quadratic equation in modular arithmetic.

At 24, Gauss’ work on number theory, which he completed when he was 21, was published as a textbook. Not only did it involve his original work, but it reconciled that of other mathematicians. It would be considered his magnum opus and had an extraordinary impact on the field.

Oh, and add to those achievements a discovery in astronomy — in the same year, 1801, Gauss calculated the orbit of an asteroid called Ceres.

After a much-accomplished life, Gauss died aged 77 on Feb. 23, 1855.

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How Cambridge Analytica works and turned ‘likes’ into political tool

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How Cambridge analytica works

The algorithm at the heart of the Facebook data breach sounds almost too dystopian to be real. It trawls through the most apparently trivial, throwaway postings –the “likes” users dole out as they browse the site – to gather sensitive personal information about sexual orientation, race, gender, even intelligence and childhood trauma. So exactly how cambridge analytica works and why it turned like in to a real world political tool.

A few dozen “likes” can give a strong prediction of which party a user will vote for, reveal their gender and whether their partner is likely to be a man or woman, provide powerful clues about whether their parents stayed together throughout their childhood and predict their vulnerability to substance abuse. And it can do all this without delving into personal messages, posts, status updates, photos or all the other information Facebook holds.

how cambridge analytica works

Some results may sound more like the result of updated online sleuthing than sophisticated data analysis; “liking” a political campaign page is little different from pinning a poster in a window.

But five years ago psychology researchers showed that far more complex traits could be deduced from patterns invisible to a human observer scanning through profiles. Just a few apparently random “likes” could form the basis for disturbingly complex character assessments.

When users liked “curly fries” and Sephora cosmetics, this was said to give clues to intelligence; Hello Kitty likes indicated political views; “Being confused after waking up from naps” was linked to sexuality. These were just some of the unexpected but consistent correlations noted in a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal in 2013. “Few users were associated with ‘likes’ explicitly revealing their attributes. For example, less than 5% of users labelled as gay were connected with explicitly gay groups, such as No H8 Campaign,” the peer-reviewed research found.

The researchers, Michal Kosinski, David Stillwell and Thore Graepel, saw the dystopian potential of the study and raised privacy concerns. At the time Facebook “likes” were public by default.


Cambridge Analytica whistleblower: ‘We spent $1m harvesting millions of Facebook profiles’ How Cambridge Analytica works.

“The predictability of individual attributes from digital records of behaviour may have considerable negative implications, because it can easily be applied to large numbers of people without their individual consent and without them noticing,” they said.

“Commercial companies, governmental institutions, or even your Facebook friends could use software to infer attributes such as intelligence, sexual orientation or political views that an individual may not have intended to share.”

To some, that may have sounded like a business opportunity. By early 2014, Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix had signed a deal with one of Kosinski’s Cambridge colleagues, lecturer Aleksandr Kogan, for a private commercial venture, separate from Kogan’s duties at the university, but echoing Kosinski’s work.

The academic had developed a Facebook app which featured a personality quiz, and Cambridge Analytica paid for people to take it, advertising on platforms such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk.

The app recorded the results of each quiz, collected data from the taker’s Facebook account – and, crucially, extracted the data of their Facebook friends as well.

The results were paired with each quiz-taker’s Facebook data to seek out patterns and build an algorithm to predict results for other Facebook users. Their friends’ profiles provided a testing ground for the formula and, more crucially, a resource that would make the algorithm politically valuable.

How Cambridge Analytica works

To be eligible to take the test the user had to have a Facebook account and be a US voter, so tens of millions of the profiles could be matched to electoral rolls. From an initial trial of 1,000 “seeders”, the researchers obtained 160,000 profiles – or about 160 per person. Eventually a few hundred thousand paid test-takers would be the key to data from a vast swath of US voters.

It was extremely attractive. It could also be deemed illicit, primarily because Kogan did not have permission to collect or use data for commercial purposes. His permission from Facebook to harvest profiles in large quantities was specifically restricted to academic use. And although the company at the time allowed apps to collect friend data, it was only for use in the context of Facebook itself, to encourage interaction. Selling data on, or putting it to other purposes, – including Cambridge Analytica’s political marketing – was strictly barred.

It also appears likely the project was breaking British data protection laws, which ban sale or use of personal data without consent. That includes cases where consent is given for one purpose but data is used for another.

The paid test-takers signed up to T&Cs, including collection of their own data, and Facebook’s default terms allowed their friends’ data to be collected by an app, unless their privacy settings allowed this. But none of them agreed to their data possibly being used to create a political marketing tool or to it being placed in a vast campaign database.

How Cambridge Analytica works

Kogan maintains everything he did was legal and says he had a “close working relationship” with Facebook, which had granted him permission for his apps.

Facebook denies this was a data breach. Vice-president Paul Grewal said: “Protecting people’s information is at the heart of everything we do, and we require the same from people who operate apps on Facebook. If these reports are true, it’s a serious abuse of our rules.”

Graphic to show key players in Cambridge Analytica story

The scale of the data collection Cambridge Analytica paid for was so large it triggered an automatic shutdown of the app’s ability to harvest profiles. But Kogan told a colleague he “spoke with an engineer” to get the restriction lifted and, within a day or two, work resumed.

Within months, Kogan and Cambridge Analytica had a database of millions of US voters that had its own algorithm to scan them, identifying likely political persuasions and personality traits. They could then decide who to target and craft their messages that was likely to appeal to them – a political approach known as “micro-targeting”.

Facebook announced on Friday that it was suspending Cambridge Analytica and Kogan from the platform pending information over misuse of data related to this project.

Facebook denies that the harvesting of tens of millions of profiles by GSR and Cambridge Analytica was a data breach. It said in a statement that Kogan “gained access to this information in a legitimate way and through the proper channels” but “did not subsequently abide by our rules” because he passed the information onto third parties.

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