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Nokia 9 release date, news and rumors




Update: Part of the Nokia 9 has seemingly been caught on camera, backing up previous leaks.

Prior to the very recent launch of the Nokia 8 it had been a long time since we’d had a Nokia flagship, but another new one is rumored to be on the way, and it’s set to be bigger than the Nokia 8.

HMD Global – the company that’s revived the Nokia name on smartphones – has so far otherwise unleashed a handful of entry-level and mid-range phones, like the Nokia 5, but the high-end Nokia 9 might launch before the year is out, and it could be positioned to compete with the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S8 and iPhone 8.

We’re already starting to hear rumors about it, all of which you’ll find below along with our expert analysis, and as soon as we hear anything new we’ll add it to this article.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? A Nokia Android flagship
  • When is it out? Probably late 2017
  • What will it cost? It will have a high-end price

Nokia 9 release date

All the Nokia 9 launch rumors we’d heard were seemingly actually referring to the Nokia 8, but that doesn’t mean the Nokia 9 is dead.

In fact, a representative for HMD Global has now hinted that the phone is on the way, and that it will have a larger screen “to meet the needs of absolutely all users.”

We don’t know when we’ll see the Nokia 9, but the rumored specs would put it in line with other 2017 flagships, so it might land before the end of the year.

Nokia 9 screen

Hottest leaks:

  • A 5.5-inch QHD OLED screen

We’ve heard multiple sources say the screen on the Nokia 9 will be a 5.5-inch QHD display.

QHD typically means 1440 x 2560 and it’s the standard flagship screen resolution, though some phones, such as the Sony Xperia XZ Premium, are now pushing above that. 5.5 inches is a fairly typical size too – not a small screen but not quite a phablet either.

The possible use of OLED is perhaps the most interesting aspect. This is the screen tech used by Samsung on many of its phones, but one which isn’t widely used elsewhere.

It tends to deliver more vibrant, but potentially less natural colors than an LCD display, and could soon be the tech of choice among flagship makers, with Apple also rumored to be using it in upcoming handsets.

However, the Nokia 8 stuck with LCD, and is only slightly smaller at 5.3 inches, so for the Nokia 9 to stand out we’d think it might push the size up further.

Nokia 9 design

Hottest leaks:

  • An all-metal body
  • Water resistance
  • A curvy build

One source claims the Nokia 9 will have an all-metal body, while another says to expect it to be IP68 certified, which would make it dust proof and water resistant to 1.5 meters deep for up to 30 minutes.

We’ve now seen a leaked image giving us a close look at the front and back of a phone believed to be the Nokia 9, and it looks a lot like the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, with a curved screen, bezels above and below and what appears to be a glass back – in contrast to the all-metal claims.

The Nokia 9 could be a curvy, glass-backed phone. Credit: @baidunokibar

The image also shows a dual-lens camera and a rear-facing fingerprint scanner.


The Nokia 9 shown here looks a lot like the photo above. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

Image 2 of 5

This side of the Nokia 9 seems to house volume controls. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

Image 3 of 5

There’s no sign of a headphone port in these images. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

Image 4 of 5

There’s a USB-C port on the bottom of the Nokia 9. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

Image 5 of 5

This side of the Nokia 9 looks to house the SIM card slot. Credit: OnLeaks / CompareRaja

We’ve also seemingly now seen an image of the Nokia 9 in the flesh, or at least its backplate, and it matches the renders above, complete with a glossy finish, a dual-lens camera and a rear-facing fingerprint scanner.

A couple of sketches have leaked out of the supply chain too, but we’re not 100 percent sure of their authenticity for now – they show a Nokia 9 with very narrow bezels top and bottom, just like several other 2017 flagships.

TechRadar’s take: The curvy leaked image of the Nokia 9 looks convincing, while water resistance is believable, as it’s a feature found on a number of high-end handsets.

Nokia 9 camera

Hottest leaks:

  • A dual-lens 22MP Carl Zeiss camera
  • A 12MP front-facing camera

The earliest Nokia 9 rumors pointed to a dual-lens camera, and a more recent leak backs that up, with a tipster claiming it will have a 22MP dual-lens Carl Zeiss snapper on the back and a 12MP camera on the front.

Both of those cameras have more megapixels than most phones, though they’re not quite a match for the 41MP Nokia Lumia 1020.

Of course megapixels aren’t everything and most flagships (including the Nokia 8) have settled on rear cameras of around 12 or 13MP, so it remains to be seen how good the cameras will actually be.

There’s also no information yet on what the second lens will be used for – it could be used for optical zoom for example, or for wide-angle shots, or something else entirely.

In the Nokia 8’s case there’s a monochrome lens and an RGB one, which are combined for better shots, especially in low light, so that’s our best guess for now.

The couple of rumors we’ve heard both point to a dual-lens camera and the Nokia 8 already has such a snapper, so that will almost certainly be what we get, but we’re less sure about the rumored megapixel count.

Nokia 9 battery

Hottest leaks:

  • A huge 3,800mAh battery
  • Fast charging

There’s only one battery rumor so far, and it points to a 3,800mAh juice pack with Qualcomm Quick Charge 4.

That would make it far bigger than most smartphone batteries, with even something like the LG G6 having just a 3,300mAh battery.

TechRadar’s take: A 3,800mAh battery seems surprisingly large for a 5.5-inch phone, so we’re not totally convinced by that, but it’s possible. Fast charging is likely, as that’s become a fairly standard flagship feature and is available on the Nokia 8.

Nokia 9 OS and power

Hottest leaks:

  • A Snapdragon 835 chipset
  • 4GB, 6GB or 8GB of RAM
  • Android 7 or later software

Early sources claim the Nokia 9 will have a Snapdragon 835 chipset and 6GB of RAM – though we’re only talking about two sources here. That would make for a high-end spec, topping even the Sony Xperia XZ Premium and the US version of the Samsung Galaxy S8, both of which use that chip but have just 4GB of RAM.

One of the sources adds that the Nokia 9 will also have an Adreno 540 GPU and run Android Nougat 7.1.2, which at time of writing is the latest Android release, but may not be by the time the phone actually launches.

Since then we’ve seen two benchmarks for the phone, both of which also list a Snapdragon 835 chipset, but one of which lists 4GB of RAM, while the other claims it comes with 8GB. However, if there is an 8GB model in the works we wouldn’t expect to see it in the west.

We wouldn’t expect to see any kind of overlay, as HMD Global has stuck with stock Android on its current crop of handsets.

TechRadar’s take: The rumored specs would put the Nokia 9 at the very top-end, but they’re not unbelievable, especially as HMD will want to make a splash with its second flagship phone. That said, we’d guess 4GB of RAM is more likely than 6GB or 8GB.

Nokia 9 other features

Hottest leaks:

  • 3D audio recording
  • An iris scanner
  • A fingerprint scanner

According to one source the Nokia 9 will have both an iris scanner and a fingerprint scanner, much like the Galaxy S8.

The same – anonymous and unproven – source claims that it will have OZO audio enhancements. This is a Nokia tech which creates a surround sound effect when you’re recording audio. It lets smartphones with four microphones record 3D audio, those with three capture spatial 360 audio, and those with two capture spatial audio.

However, the source doesn’t mention how many mics the Nokia 9 has, so even if this is true we don’t know how heavily it will be able to take advantage of the tech.

TechRadar’s take: None of these rumors are unbelievable, but as they all come from the same unproven source we wouldn’t read too much into them.

Nokia 9 price

Hottest leaks:

  • A $699 (roughly £640/AU$1,060) price
  • May cost more for higher storage capacities

Only one tipster has mentioned the possible price of the Nokia 9 so far and they reckon it’s going to be expensive, coming in at $699 in the US (around £565/AU$935) and 749 euros (roughly £640/AU$1,060).

Direct conversions are rarely accurate, but of the two the second one is likely to be closer to the UK and Australian price, as phone prices tend to be higher internationally than you’d get with a direct conversion from the US price.

The source also mentioned that the Nokia 9 will come in both 64GB and 128GB varieties. They didn’t specify which of those these prices are for, but we’d assume this is the starting price, in which case you’d get 64GB for that.


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Facebook personal data use and privacy settings ruled illegal by German court | Technology



The court found that Facebook collects and uses personal data without providing enough information to its members for them to render meaningful consent.
Photograph: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook’s default privacy settings and use of personal data are against German consumer law, according to a judgement handed down by a Berlin regional court.

The court found that Facebook collects and uses personal data without providing enough information to its members for them to render meaningful consent. The federation of German consumer organisations (VZBV), which brought the suit, argued that Facebook opted users in to features which it should not have.

Heiko Duenkel, litigation policy officer at the VZBV, said: “Facebook hides default settings that are not privacy friendly in its privacy centre and does not provide sufficient information about it when users register. This does not meet the requirement for informed consent.”

In a statement, VZBV elaborated on some of its issues: “In the Facebook app for smartphones, for example, a location service was pre-activated that reveals a user’s location to people they are chatting to.

“In the privacy settings, ticks were already placed in boxes that allowed search engines to link to the user’s timeline. This meant that anyone could quickly and easily find personal Facebook profiles.”

The Berlin court agreed with VZBV that the five default settings the group had complained about were invalid as declarations of consent. The German language judgment was handed down in mid-January, but only publicly revealed on Monday.

The court also ruled eight clauses in Facebook’s terms of service to be invalid, including terms that allow Facebook to transmit data to the US and use personal data for commercial purposes. The company’s “authentic name” policy – a revision of a rule that once required users to use their “real names” on the site, but which now allows them to use any names they are widely known by – was also ruled unlawful.

In a statement, Facebook said it would appeal, adding: “We are working hard to ensure that our guidelines are clear and easy to understand, and that the services offered by Facebook are in full accordance with the law.”

A week after the Berlin court ruled against Facebook, the social network promised to radically overhaul its privacy settings, saying the work would prepare it for the introduction in Europe of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a sweeping set of laws governing data use across the EU.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, announced the changes, saying they would “put the core privacy settings for Facebook in one place and make it much easier for people to manage their data”.

The European Union’s new stronger, unified data protection laws, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will come into force on 25 May 2018, after more than six years in the making.

GDPR will replace the current patchwork of national data protection laws, give data regulators greater powers to fine, make it easier for companies with a “one-stop-shop” for operating across the whole of the EU, and create a new pan-European data regulator called the European Data Protection Board.

The new laws govern the processing and storage of EU citizens’ data, both that given to and observed by companies about people, whether or not the company has operations in the EU. They state that data protection should be both by design and default in any operation.

GDPR will refine and enshrine the “right to be forgotten” laws as the “right to erasure”, and give EU citizens the right to data portability, meaning they can take data from one organisation and give it to another. It will also bolster the requirement for explicit and informed consent before data is processed, and ensure that it can be withdrawn at any time.

To ensure companies comply, GDPR also gives data regulators the power to fine up to €20m or 4% of annual global turnover, which is several orders of magnitude larger than previous possible fines. Data breaches must be reported within 72 hours to a data regulator, and affected individuals must be notified unless the data stolen is unreadable, ie strongly encrypted.

Facebook has faced repeated attacks from European regulators, particularly those in Germany, over issues ranging from perceived anti-competitive practices to alleged misuse of customer data.

Since March 2016, the company has been investigated by the German Federal Cartel Office over allegations it breaches data protection law in order to support an unfair monopoly. In an interim update in December last year, the office said that it objected to the way Facebook gains access to third-party data when an account is opened. This includes transferring information from its own WhatsApp and Instagram products – as well as how it tracks which sites its users access.

In October, Facebook was the target of an EU-wide investigation over a similar issue. The Article 29 Working Party (WP29), which oversees data regulation issues across the European Union, launched a taskforce to examine the sharing of user data between WhatsApp and Facebook, which it says does not have sufficient user consent. When the data sharing feature was first announced in 2016, the group warned Facebook that it may not be legal under European law, prompting the company to pause the data transfer until a resolution was found.

“Whilst the WP29 notes there is a balance to be struck between presenting the user with too much information and not enough, the initial screen made no mention at all of the key information users needed to make an informed choice, namely that clicking the agree button would result in their personal data being shared with the Facebook family of companies,” the group told WhatsApp in October.

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Samsung S9 vs iPhone X vs Pixel 2: which one should you buy?



In the last five months, three of the most well-known smartphone manufacturers – Apple, Samsung and Google – have announced new flagship devices. Google led the pack in October with the release of its Pixel 2, with Apple following a month later with the iPhone X. Now Samsung has revealed its own hand with the announcement of the Galaxy S9 at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

There’s not a great deal separating these devices at the top-end of the smartphone market, although each device has its own strengths and weaknesses in different areas. So to help you work out the best device for your own needs, we’ve put together a guide to how they compare.


The Pixel 2 has a five-inch 1080p AMOLED display with a chunky bezel at the top and bottom of the screen. This is the smallest screen of the three flagships, which is to be expected since it has the smallest overall footprint too, but it does feel a little squeezed compared to the other two phones. Flip the Pixel 2 over and you’ll find some models have a contrast colour scheme on the back, with the top section of the phone a slightly different shade to the rest of the back. Whether this rocks your boat is down to personal preference, but its a nice touch of personality that is sometimes missing from these top-tier devices.


Enter the Samsung Galaxy S9. Its 5.8-inch Quad HD AMOLED screen takes up almost all of the front of the device, leaving just a narrow strip of bezel at either end. At either side, the screen gently curves around the sides of the device, blending neatly into the rear. On the back of the phone, the fingerprint scanner has been shifted to sit directly beneath the camera. Compared to the Pixel 2, the S9 is a much slicker-looking device, all smooth curves and shiny glass, that fits much more screen into a similarly-sized device. It’s also the only of these devices to have a 3.5 mm headphone jack, so if you’re still fully wired up, this is the phone for you.

Dimensions compared

The iPhone X also has a 5.8-inch, screen even though the device as a whole is a tad smaller than the S9. And as is the case with the S9, the iPhone X screen fills almost the entire of the front of the device, save for the notorious notch that takes a chunk out at the very top. There’s no fingerprint scanner on the iPhone X, since Apple decided to go all-in on Face ID with this model, and some people might find it more inconvenient using their face to verify payments or unlock the device instead of a finger, so that’s worth bearing in mind if you’re picking between the devices.


All three of these phones have extremely capable cameras, so picking between them again comes down to a matter of personal taste. The single-lens 12.2 megapixel rear-facing camera on the Pixel 2 has an aperture with an f-stop of 1.8, which makes it particularly well-suited to photography in low-light conditions – and recent software updates have given the camera another boost. Aside from its snapping skills, Google has integrated some machine learning smarts into its camera so you can point its at an object in the real world and use Google Assistant to identify it and bring up relevant information.


Since it’s only just been announced, the jury is still out on the Galaxy S9 camera, although initial indications are that Samsung has managed to set a new high when it comes to smartphone cameras. Like the Pixel 2, the main S9 camera also has one lens, and a 12 megapixel sensor, but the S9 has another trick up its sleeve. A variable aperture feature widens up the camera’s f-stop in low light conditions, letting in way more light than most smartphone cameras are able to capture in relative darkness. In normal light conditions, the camera automatically switches to a more conventional f-stop for better focussing. The ability to record slow-mo at 960 fps is a nice too, too.

Cameras compared

The iPhone X also has a 12 megapixel sensor, but this one is a part of a dual-lens setup, with one wide-angle lens paired with a telephoto lens for photos with plenty of Instagram-friendly bokeh. Dual optical image stabilisation smooths out videos taken in bumpy circumstances while the X’s quad-LED flash is supposed to smoothly light backgrounds and foregrounds without washing subjects out.


There’s not an awful lot between these phones when it comes to their insides. The S9 and Pixel 2 both have super-fast eight-core processors, while the X’s six-core processor is more than capable of powering everything the phone can do. If plenty of storage capacity is a must, then the S9 has a Micro SD slot that can fit in up to a 400 GB SD card, while the Pixel and the X both max out at 256 GB. When it comes to battery, however, the S9 leads the pack with its 3,00mAh battery, while the X’s battery weighs in at 2716mAh and the Pixel 2 at 2,700. All should last a day of mixed use.


If you’re in the market for a new phone and only the best will do, then you’ve got a tough decision ahead of you. In terms of specs, these phones are more or less on par with each other, but if a big screen is a must then you can rule out the Pixel 2 and decide between the other contenders. Photos are more subjective, and each of these phones will hardly disappoint in the camera department, so it’s worth taking the time to get hands-on with these devices and take a few test shots to decide which one is really ticking your boxes. Whichever you chose, you can’t go far wrong.

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